The Role of Friendship in Rebuilding a Relationship

blendedfamilies

Helping Blended Marriages Succeed

How to Help Blended Marriages Succeed with Family Counseling

One of the benefits of a mobile and Internet savvy society is that information is easily shared. Today, we are learning and sharing new data and new techniques that ultimately help families survive as a single healthy and happy unit. However, we still see a large number of relationships fail.  As a consequence, blended marriages have become part of the norm. They bring with them a mountain of problems and can be the hardest to maintain, especially without outside assistance.

While two adults may come together and share a common bond, that doesn’t mean their children will as well. Some blended marriages work brilliantly and these are serving as great guides when it comes to teaching others about how to embark on a similar path. This is where the sharing of techniques and ideas has been such a bonus. We now know that when two parents are considering a blended arrangement, their first steps should be to seek counseling.

Unfortunately, most people rush in where others would fear to tread. In a blended relationship, the consequences can be pretty harsh where even the smallest things get on people’s nerves. By participating in several family-based counseling sessions before coming together as a single family unit, expectations and fears can be discussed. One of the most important outcomes from these sessions. is that each member of the new family now has a firm idea of the fears and expectations of everyone else. They can also learn better communication tactics and techniques for dealing with problems when they arise.

Family counseling can be undertaken after an event, but keep in mind, this is like trying to treat a problem. By undertaking counseling prior to committing to a full time relationship, you are essentially vaccinating the family against future problems. There are no guarantees and members of blended families do have to work harder to make them succeed. Early counseling sessions are one valuable tool that should not be dismissed too lightly.

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Anxiety Help for Fears and Phobias

Anxiety Help for Fears and Phobias: You're Not Alone

Looking for anxiety help? If you struggle with panic attacks, chronic worry, social phobia, generalized anxiety disorder, phobias or obsessive compulsive disorder, here's help that’s practical and powerful.

Anxiety disorders are generally very treatable, but people who experience them find them hard to overcome. The reason is that while most people have the ability to recover, anxiety literally tricks them into using methods that make their fears worse rather than better.

This is the most natural thing in the world. People think of chronic anxiety as something that invades their lives, something they have to resist and oppose. However, the worst problems come from our efforts to resist and remove anxiety, rather than from the anxiety itself.

People do not get fooled by this trick entirely on their own. All too often well meaning friends, doctors, and therapists get fooled by it as well, and unwittingly suggest methods to their patients that make the situation worse.

For instance, there’s a well publicized technique called “thought stopping”, in which you snap a rubber band against your wrist when you have an anxious thought, and say “stop!” to yourself. It's hard for me to understand why professionals still suggest this idea, because it's very unlikely to be of any help. The more you tell yourself not to think something, the more you’ll think about it.

If you want a quick demonstration right now, take two minutes and don’t think about dancing elephants.

See what I mean? Don’t even think about thought stopping.

When anxiety tricks you, you get fooled into using recovery methods that actually make your fears stronger and more persistent. The more you fight an anxiety disorder, the more it grows. It’s like putting out fires with gasoline.

When your fears and worries and undue anxieties overcome you, give us a call.  We can help.

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Infidelity Doesn’t Have to Destroy a Relationship

Infidelity Doesn’t Have to Destroy a Relationship

Infidelity in a relationship is often one of the hardest problems to overcome, yet rarely is it a serious sign that a relationship is over. There are couples that are completely devoted to one another yet involved with others outside the relationship. Of course, let’s not kid one another, infidelity can also mean the relationship is well beyond its save-by-date.

The difference between the two lies behind the reasons for infidelity. Have you ever wondered why people engage in extra-marital relationships? They will often tell you its more exciting, more fun and totally different to what they experience at home. But then, it should be. The whole experience is heightened by several factors, one of which is the fear of discovery and the second being the tasting of the forbidden fruit. If you could translate that to the home, things would be different there as well.

A relationship doesn’t have to end because one person in the relationship has been unfaithful. What is needed is a careful appraisal of where the relationship is and why that person found the need to venture outside the relationship. Once those issues have been dealt with, you will then need to deal with issues of trust.

When it comes to infidelity, what destroys the relationship is loss of trust. If you can rebuild that trust then the relationship can continue to grow, often much stronger than before. If you cannot rebuild the trust then that relationship could be doomed to failure. It will certainly see its fair share of arguments, accusations, and counter accusations.

If infidelity has affected your relationship, consider your options. Can you forgive, forget, and move on, or do you need help? If you need help, call us.  We can assist you in rebuilding the trust.

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